BPG Book Decoration

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Book and Paper Group Wiki > Book Conservation Wiki > Book Decoration

Wiki Contributors: Olivia Primanis, Mary Baughman, Kevin Auer, Meaghan Brown, Suzy Morgan, Katherine Parks

Copyright 2020. The Book and Paper Group Wiki is a publication of the Book and Paper Group of the American Institute for Conservation. It is published as a convenience for the members of the Book and Paper Group. Publication does not endorse nor recommend any treatments, methods, or techniques described herein. There is an ongoing project to update the BPG Wiki. We welcome contributions and feedback. If you would like to get involved in this effort, please contact the wiki team at [email protected].

Contents

Methods of Book Decoration

Blind Tooling

"Bindings that are decorated in blind as the result of unheated or heated tools pressed into dampened leather; the resulting dark imprint is described as blind." (Miller 2014, 438)

Gold Tooling

"The act of using heated line tools, letter tools, and finishing tools to letter and decorate a binding with gold leaf. The most basic steps of the process include: blind tooling a design on a cover; painting the design area with an adhesive such as glaire (egg whites) based on recipes that varied binder to binder and were usually secret; laying gold leaf over the design area; repeating the tooling of the design area, making every effort to strike the original blind design dead on; and possibly laying on one or more additional layers of leaf, and tooling again. Good gold tooling requires great patience, superb hand-eye coordination, and constant practice." (Miller 2014, 458-9)

Types of Book Decoration

Abstract

Acorn

All over design

"A style of finishing in which the entire cover,as distinct from the corners, center or borders,is decorated by a single motif, multiple motifs,or a decorative roll." [1] "A binding decorated so profusely that it is literally covered 'allover' with ornamentation." (Miller 2014, 434)

Alla rustica binding

"A paper binding, essentially a paper case binding, used on Italian and Spanish books from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century." (Miller 2014, 434)

Allegorical panel

American

Antique

Appliqué Binding

"Any binding that has decorative elements added to the covers, but the term is particularly applied to the use of silver gimp, metal cut outs and spangles found on seventeenth- and eighteenth-century embroidered or silk bindings." (Miller 2014, 435)

Apollo and Pegasus

See Cameo Binding. "...early cameo bindings include the Apollo and Pegasus bindings of the sixteenth century, bound for Giovanni Battista Grimaldi." (Miller 2014, 441)

Architectural

Armorial

"Leather or cloth bindings embossed with armorial seals or plaques, frequently in a panel, or embroidered bindings in which the arms were raised in relief and worked in thread." [2]

Art nouveau

"The term used to describe a fluid, rounded style of decorating bindings using the soft color palette, and the floral and pictorial motifs associated with Art Nouveau design, early Arts and Crafts Movement, William Morris, and the Bloomsbury Circle." (Miller 2014, 435)

Azured or hatched motifs

Bindings decorated with an azured tool, which has "closely spaced parallel lines cut diagonally across its surface". [3]

"An obsolete term for a decorative tool with parallel lines cut across the face to create a shaded or hatched effect; in heraldic designs, the azured areas represent 'blue'." (Miller 2014, 436)

Backless

"A style of novelty binding where all four edges of the textblock are visible and available for decoration. The style was accomplished by sewing on tapes and the spine lined and decorated, or stab-sewing the text and cutting off the spine folds, leaving a fourth edge for gilding or other decoration. The style was associated with Richard Balley in England, active from the 1680s to around 1711." (Miller 2014, 436)

Basketwork

Bradel

A type of binding that originated in Germany with the shop of Alexis Pierre Bradel. Characterized by a hollow back, similar to a library binding, and generally having split boards that were attached to the text block by a cloth spine lining. Many bindings "a la Bradel" are quarter bound with cloth or leather spine and paper sides.

"A style of temporary binding developed in Germany, where the flanges of a spine lining cloth is inserted into a split in each board along the spine edge; then a leather or linen cover is attached; the book has a hollow back. The style is similar to the lapped-component case binding also developed in Germany, where the flanges of a custom-fitted paper spine piece is adhered to the inside of the boards before the cover of vellum, leather, cloth, or decorated paper is attached." (Miller 2014, 440)

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

Cambridge

"Books bound in this style were sewn on raised cords, covered in calfskin that was masked and sprinkled in such a manner as to leave a stained central rectangular panel, a plain rectangular frame, which, in turn, was surrounded by a stained outside frame. The books had Dutchmarble endpapers and red edges. The spine was pieced with red russia leather labels and had double blind lines at head and tail on each side of the raised bands. The covers were decoratedw ith a two-line fillet close to the edges and on each side of the panel. and with a narrow flower roll worked on each side of the panel close to the lines. There were many variations of this style,including some books tooled in gold, and some with marbled covers and sprinkled panels." [4]

Cambridge style in leather

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

COLLECTION Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin
 
BINDING DESCRIPTION
BINDING TERM Cambridge Binding
DECORATION Check –-Cambridge style, or Cambridge panel style: A style of bookbinding popular at the end of the 17th century and beginning of the 18th. Characterized by three concentric frames (including a perimeter frame) formed with gilt or blind fillets or rolls, with fleurons or other small tools anchoring the corners. The space defined by the frames is often further delineated by sprinkling or toning with acid. Earlier versions of this pattern do not have the multitonal effect. This design is common to all of England, not just Cambridge.
REPAIRS  
COVER material/hardware, etc, corner style/turn ins, repairs brown tanned calfskin
BOARDS material, back cornering pulpboard, gentle shaping
SPINE rounding/ backing lining gently backed
ENDBANDS style, material/color, core material Sewn blue and white?) endbands with front bead. Rolled paper core
SEWING style, # stations, support material lacing in Five raised bands with cord supports, 2 ole lacing.
ENDPAPERS material, # of flyleaves/attachment Double folio sewn on. Evidenceof removed leaves.
TEXT BLOCK material, edge treatment  
HOUSING  
NOTES  
DESCRIBER (s) Meaghan J. Brown, M. Baughman, O. Primanis
Citations/ SEE ALSO See Also: Paper descriptions: Elizabeth Lunning and Roy Perkinson. The Print Council of America Paper Sample Book: A Practical Guide to the Description of Paper. The Print Council of America. Sun Hill Press, 1996.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CATALOGING RECORD accessed 10/08

Uniform title Bible. O.T. Heptateuch. Anglo-Saxon. Aelfric. Selections. 1698.

Title Heptateuchus, liber Job, et Evangelium Nicodemi; Anglo-Saxonice. : Historiæ Judith fragmentum; Dano-Saxonice. / Edidit nunc primum ex mss codicibus Edwardus Thwaites ...

Added title Bible. O.T. Job. Anglo-Saxon. Aelfric. Selections. 1698.

Gospel of Nicodemus. Anglo-Saxon. Selections. 1698.

Bible. O.T. Apocrypha. Judith. Anglo-Saxon. Selections. 1698.

Imprint Oxoniæ: E Theatro Sheldoniano, 1698.

Harry Ransom Center Book Collection BS 130 A45 1698 LIB USE ONLY

Description [8], 168, 32 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 24 cm. (4to)

Note Contains portions of the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges and Job in the translation ascribed to Aelfric. Cf. Darlow & Moule.

Signatures: pi?-X?A-2D?

Engraved frontispiece, head-pieces and historiated initials.

This edition is know to exist in at least two issues: in issue 1, the verso of t.p. has the imprimatur of Joh. Meare, Dec. 27, 1697; in issue 2 the verso of t.p. is blank.

HRC copy 1 is issue 1, copy 2 is issue 2. TxU-Hu

Indexed in: Darlow & Moule 1606

Wing B2198

Local note HRC copy 1: inscribed: Wm. Harvey on p. 164; shelfmark of Sir Thomas Phillipps[?]; ms. notations. Copy 2: bookplate with cipher A.C [Arthur Charlett]; formerly classified: Ac/Ae43/698h; accession no.: 658775; paper covers, tooled in the Cambridge style.

Subject Aelfric, Abbot of Eynsham.

Genre Paper covers – England – ca. 1698

Cambridge style bindings

Added author Thwaites, Edward, 1667-1711.

Special collection: Theatrum Sheldonianum, printer/press

Harvey, William, former owner

Phillipps, Thomas, Sir, 1792-1872, former owner

Charlett, Arthur, 1655-1722, former owner

OCLC number 4899857H

Cambridge style done in paper

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

University of Texas Cataloging Record
 
BINDING DESCRIPTION
COVER material/hardware, etc corner style/turn ins repairs  
BOARDS material back cornering  
SPINE rounding/ backing lining  
ENDBANDS style material/color core material  
SEWING style #stations support material lacing in  
ENDPAPERS material # of flyleaves/attachment  
TEXT BLOCK material edge treatment  
DECORATION style  
describer (s) Baughman, Metzger, Primanis

Another variant of the Cambridge style done in leather

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

COLLECTION Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin
 
BINDING DESCRIPTION
BINDING TERM Cambridge style, or Cambridge panel style: A style of bookbinding popular at the end of the 17th century and beginning of the 18th. Characterized by three concentric frames (including a perimeter frame) formed with gilt or blind fillets or rolls, with fleurons or other small tools anchoring the corners. The space defined by the frames is often further delineated by sprinkling or toning with acid. Earlier versions of this pattern do not have the multitonal effect. This design is common to all of England, not just Cambridge.
DECORATION Three concentric frames formed by a single blind fillet. Inner two frames are connected at the corners by a blind fillet, and the inner most frame further decorated by a gold roll and told corner tools. Four gilt fleurons anchor the corners between the second and outermost blind frames. Gold fillets delineate the six raised bands. Gold roll on turnins. Silver corners, central diamond, and clasp furnishings. Catch on the back board. Furnishings are unusual for this period.
REPAIRS Leather repairs at the head and tail. First and last gatherings may have been resewn and endpapers are now heavily tipped.
COVER material/hardware, etc, corner style/turn ins, repairs Full brown sheep or goatskin, uneven turn ins. Corners covered by silver furnishings. Six raised bands. Tightback.
BOARDS material, back cornering Binder's board, unshaped, not back cornered.
SPINE rounding/ backing lining Rounded and backed. Linings are not visible.
ENDBANDS style, material/color, core material Dull beige front bead endbands sewn over tawed supports. Red and blue tie downs found at the front and back of text block suggesting that current endbands are not original.
SEWING style, # stations, support material lacing in Two-on, over six raised bands. Sewing pattern may not be consistent throughout text block. Support material is probably cord.
ENDPAPERS material, # of flyleaves/attachment Dutch pattern curled marbled paper pastedown, and made marbled flyleaf. Front endpapers have two beige (1) thin (2) slightly textured (2) handmade laid paper flyleaves. Rear endpapers have three flyleaves.
TEXT BLOCK material, edge treatment Beige (1) medium (1) slightly textured (2) handmade laid paper. Edges gilt.
HOUSING  
NOTES  
DESCRIBER (s) Meaghan J. Brown, M. Baughman, O. Primanis
Citations/ SEE ALSO See Also: Paper descriptions: Elizabeth Lunning and Roy Perkinson. The Print Council of America Paper Sample Book: A Practical Guide to the Description of Paper. The Print Council of America. Sun Hill Press, 1996.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CATALOGING RECORD accessed 8/09

University of Texas Cataloging Record

Note: Signature collations may be erroneous due to problems developed during database migration to a new OPAC system.

Corporate author Church of England.

Uniform title Book of common prayer

Title The book of common prayer and administration of the sacraments, : and other rites and ceremonies of the church, according to the use of the Church of England; together with the psalter or Psalms of David, pointed as they are to be sung or said in churches.

Imprint Cambridge, : Printed by John Field ..., 1663.

Harry Ransom Center Evelyn Waugh Collection

BX 5145 A4 1663 WAU

LIB USE ONLY

Description [188] p. ; 24 cm. (4to)

Note Signatures: a-b4,c2,A-X4.

In double columns.

Title within double rule border.

Indexed in: Wing B.3627

Local note Cambridge style binding with silver furniture.

Armorial bookplate of Evelyn Waugh; inscribed: for Evelyn Waugh from Alastair Graham, 1924; inscribed: Marshall Sutton; inscribed: Henricus Sutton [&] Dorothea Sutton May 20 A.D. 1670; genealogy of William Winstone Curtis-Hayward family on back free end papers.

With this are bound: Bible. English. Authorized. 1663. The Holy Bible. Cambridge, 1663 – Sternhold, Thomas.

The whole book of Psalms. [Cambridge], 1663.

Genre Cambridge style bindings

Silver furniture

Special collection: Field, John, printer/press

Graham, Alastair, former owner

Sutton, Dorothea, former owner

Sutton, Henricus, former owner

Sutton, Marshall, former owner

Waugh, Evelyn, 1903-1966, former

Cameo

"Cameo bindings originated in Italy in the sixteenth century and reflected the Renaissance interest in classical antiquities, particularly coins and carved gems. Actual cameos were sometimes inlaid into leather covers, but usually, the cameo was cut into a stamp and pressed in relief into leather or vellum pieces that were then inlaid, sometimes painted or gilded. The practice of inlaying portrait heads or figures continued periodically throughout the history of binding through the nineteenth century. Notable early cameo bindings include the Apollo and Pegasus bindings of the sixteenth century, bound for Giovanni Battista Grimaldi." See medallion binding. (Miller 2014, 441)

Canterbury

Carolingian

"The earliest surviving Carolingian bindings are German and French with a few survivals in other European countries. They date from the eighth century and are distinguished by the universal use of sewing supports in conjunction with herringbone sewing. Other features include wooden boards, usually oak and often quarter sawn, the edges cut square or sometimes slightly beveled, with tunnel and channel board preparation to receive the lacing of the ends of sewing supports. The books often have vellum pastedowns. The endbands are sewn in a simple linking style, without a support core, across the head and tail of the spine." (Miller 2014, 442)

Cathedral

"Bookbindings executed between about 1810 and approximately 1840 in England and France. The name derives from the motifs of the embellishment, e.g., Gothic architecture, rose windows, and the like. " [5]

Center and Corner binding

A style consisting of an abstract center piece, either oval or lozenge shaped, made of one stamp and four corner pieces, large ornaments that sat at the corners of a frame. The designs are always symmetrical both vertically and horizontally. Also Centerpiece and cornerpiece binding "A term coined by Howard Nixon to describe a decorative style resulting from early Islamic influence and typified by intricately engraved centerpiece and cornerpiece stamps. Variations of the style appeared on Western bindings from the fifteenth century through the nineteenth century." (Miller 2014, 443)


Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

BINDING DESCRIPTION
BINDING TERM Center and Corner binding: A style consisting of an abstract center piece, either oval or lozenge shaped, made of one stamp and four corner pieces, large ornaments that sat at the corners of a frame. The designs are always symmetrical both vertically and horizontally.
COVER material/hardware, etc corner style/turn ins repairs Full brown calf, mitered corners, uneven turn ins. Tightback.
DECORATION style Center and corner stamped in gilt, flat spine profile with seven double gilt lines. Initials "E C" tooled in gilt. Gold rolled edges. Textblock trimmed and gilt. Remains of clasps: catch on lower cover, parchment straps for hasp broken.
BOARDS material back cornering Binder's board, unshaped, back cornered.
SPINE rounding/ backing lining Rounded and backed. Lined, but a prior repair has made it difficult to identify the lining.
ENDBANDS style material/color core material Front bead, hand sewn green and pink end band over cord core.
SEWING style support material lacing in Sewn two on over four alum tawed thongs. Grooves were sawn into the textblock to recess the thongs.
ENDPAPERS material # of flyleaves/attachment Beige (2) medium ( 1) slightly textured (2) handmade laid paper. One free fly leaf and paste down. Prior to repair, may have been one paste down and three fly-leaves, with two of the front fly leaves removed and two of the rear flyleaves adhered to the paste down.
TEXT BLOCK material edge treatment Beige (1) thin (2) slightly textured (1) handmade laid paper. Edges trimmed and gilt.
NOTES Contains multiple works published at different times.
describer (s) Brown, Primanis

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CATALOGING RECORD

Note: Signature collations may be erroneous due to problems developed during database migration to a new OPAC system.

Author Sternhold, Thomas, d. 1549.

Title The whole booke of Psalmes. / Collected into English meeter by T. Sternhold, I. Hopk. and others: conferred with the Hebrew, with apt notes to sing them withall.

Imprint [London] : Printed for the Company of Stationers., 1618.

Harry Ransom Center Book Collection

BX 5145 A4 1613

LIB USE ONLY

Description 1 psalter ([34], 316, [34] p.) ; 15 cm. (8vo)

Local note Bound with: Church of England. The booke of common praier. Imprinted at London, 1613.

Note "Set forth and allowed to be sung in all churches of al the people togither before and after morning and euening prayer, as also before & after sermons, and moreouer, in priuate houses, for their godly solace & comfort, laying apart al vngodly songs and ballads, which tend only to the norishing of vice and corrupting of youth."

Signatures: A-2A8

Title within ornamental border.

Tail-piece.

Pages 22, 140, 231, 310, and 315 misnumbered 12, 148, 213, 308 and 313 (with 2nd 3 backwards) respectively.

Includes index: p. [31]-[33] at end.

Page [34] at end is blank.

Indexed in: STC 2561

Local note Williford Collection.

Subject Bible. O.T. Psalms – Paraphrases, English.

Psalms (Music)

Added author Hopkins, John, d. 1570.

Special collection: Company of Stationers, printer/press

OCLC number 14578949

Centerpiece

Centerpiece made of small tools

Chapbook

"A name given to small pamphlets, which dates from at least the fifteenth century. Chapbooks often relied on woodcut images more than words to transmit ideas and are associated with religious and political themes, as well as being a popular format for fairytales, ballads, and moral self-improvement stories intended for children. Chapbooks were sold by chapmen (colporteurs) who carried all sorts of notions in addition to booklets. The use of the format ended around 1830, although numerous books continued to be called "chapbooks." (Miller 2014, 444)

Champlevé

"Enamel bindings that were produced between the eleventh and thirteenth centuries. A metal (gold or copper) sheet would have designs cut into it that would be filled with enamel; sometimes an entire cover was decorated this way, and sometimes only a border or corners were enameled. Champlevé bindings have irregular widths of metal dividing the pockets of enamel compared to cloisonné examples. Seecloisonné bindings and enamel bindings. (Miller 2014, 443)

Chippendale or Chinoiserie style

"A style of book decoration, where the books were generally covered in red morocco, and were tooled in gold with elaborate rococo borders of swirls and acanthus leaves enclosing areas dispersed with meshes of dotted lines." [6]

Classical

Cologne binding

Col tempo

Cornerpiece

Cornerpiece made of small tools

Cortina or curtain

Cosway

"Leather bookbindings produced in the usual manner, except that they have miniature paintings inset into their covers. " [7] "Early twentieth-century leather bindings, usually bound by Robert Rivière, with miniature paintings on ivory set into their covers. The style is named for the English miniaturist Edward Cosway (ca. 1742-1821), although he was dead before the style came into use." (Miller 2014, 447)

Cottage

"A style of book decoration in which the top and bottom of a center rectangular panel slope away from a broken center, producing a kind of gabled effect. The spaces are filled in, at times, with French sprays and branches in combination with lacework, and sometimes with the same small tools used in the fan ornament. " [8]

"A style of binding most closely associated with England in the late-seventeenth into the eighteenth century, although it was used in Ireland as well. The style persisted into the first quarter of the nineteenth century for almanacs and some devotional works. The basis of the name was the use of a broken or unbroken roof line at the top and bottom of the design area of a cover. Usually the cover was almost filled with the built-up designs including teardrop shapes, arabesques, dots, and hanging sprays of built up foliage descending and ascending from the roof corners. Also called cottage-roof binnding. (Miller 2014, 447)

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

BINDING DESCRIPTION
COVER material/hardware, etc corner style/turn ins repairs red goatskin lapped corners, turn-ins untrimmed none
BOARDS material back cornering paste board outside back cornered
SPINE rounding/ backing lining slightly rounded /pulled on boards? NV
ENDBANDS style material/color core material core with front bead red and white
SEWING style #stations support material lacing in raised cords 4 NV NV
ENDPAPERS material # of flyleaves/attachment marbled paper 2, made endpapers
TEXT BLOCK material edge treatment paper gilt and gauffered
DECORATION style Cottage
describer (s) Baughman, Metzger, Primanis

University of Texas Cataloging Record 8/02

UNIFORM TITLE: Bible. N.T. English. Authorized. 1707.

TITLE: The New Testament of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, : newly translated out of the original Greek, and with the former translations diligently compared and revised. By His Majesties special command. Appointed to be read in churches.

PUBLISHED: London, : Printed by Charles Bill, and the executrix of Thomas Newcomb, deceas'd ..., 1707. DESCRIPTION: (312) p. ; 13 cm. (12mo) NOTES: Signatures: A-N12. Text in two columns, within red line border.

COPY NOTES: Stamped on spine: I.B. Cottage roof style binding.

SPECIAL KEYWORDS: Printer/Press: Bill, Charles. Printer/Press: Newcomb, Thomas, executrix of. Provenance: B., I. Binding: Cottage roof style bindings.

OCLC NUMBER: 12284735

Locations:BS 2085 1707 L6 1707 Humanities Research Center USE IN LIBRARY ONLY

"Cottonian" Library cloth cover

"Bindings from the library of English poet Robert Southey that were covered by his daughters and their friends in chintz cloth jackets with a neatly lettered label. The practice of covering bindings in the home with a secondary cloth cover was widespread in the eighteenth and nineteenth century." (Miller 2014, 447)

Cubist

Cuir-bouilli

Cuir-cisilé

"A decorative style known as lederschnitt, or leather cutting. It was practiced for a fairly short time in the fifteenth century, primarily in a few areas of Germany and Spain. The decoration involved cutting a design into damp leather and using pointed tools to pepper parts of the design area to bring them into relief; sometimes a design was embossed into the skin from the flesh side. The designs range from crude to extremely refined." (Miller 2014, 448)

Cupid

Cut-vellum

"A style of luxury or deluxe binding where shapes are cut or punched out of the piece of vellum intended for a cover and lined with velvet for a dramatic and beautiful effect. The style is similar to early Coptic bindings that had small shapes punched out of the cover leather that were backed with gold leaf on vellum patches. The style requires that the design in the vellum be punched and the backing added before the covering is attached to the boards/text block." (Miller 2014, 448)

Dentelle

"An 18th century style of book decoration, usually in gold, consisting of a combination of elliptical scrolls of slightly shaded leafy character joined to clusters and horders of great richness, resembling lace, and pointing toward the center of the cover." [5]


"Dentelle is a French term for lacy and is applied to bindings that have a wide border of filigree tooling, usually in gold around the boards. The effect can be achieved with rolls or built-up with small tools, or the combination. Dentelle bindings have an undulating inner edge usually brought to points going towards the center of the cover. The style is reminiscent of Islamic center-and-cornerpiece. The great binder Antoine Michel Padeloup (1685-1758) is credited with introducing the dentelle, and the Derome and Dubuisson buinding families are the most famous of the many who copied the style." (Miller 2014, 449)

An example of a dentelle style binding can be found on the National Library of Sweden's Flickr page.

Diaper

"An allover, diamond-shaped pattern, small or large, that forms part of a binding design. Diaper patterns have adorned bindings from the middle of the first millennium." (Miller 2014, 449)

Diced

"The use of dicing, tooling on the diagonal, to create an all-over pattern of small diamonds on a leather binding. Diced calf was especially popular from the first quarter of the nineteenth century; the smooth leather took the dicing easily and was attractive. Cloth for bindings in the nineteenth century was also given a small diced grain, a popular pattern." (Miller 2014, 449)

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

COLLECTION Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin
 
BINDING DESCRIPTION
BINDING TERM Diced Russia Calfskin
DECORATION Diced
REPAIRS Rebacked with tanned goatskin, 3 corners repaired.
COVER material/hardware, etc, corner style/turn ins, repairs Full diced russia calfskin, with 4 false raised bands.
BOARDS material, back cornering Mill board, back cornered.
SPINE rounding/ backing lining Slightly rounded and backed.
ENDBANDS style, material/color, core material Double endband with a front bead. Red, light- blue, white silk(?)Leather core.
SEWING style, # stations, support material lacing in Sewn on 5 sunken cords. Support and lacing are not visible.
ENDPAPERS material, # of flyleaves/attachment Stormont stone pattern</p>
TEXT BLOCK material, edge treatment Grain long, handmade laid paper.
HOUSING  
NOTES  
DESCRIBER (s) Meaghan J. Brown, M. Baughman, O. Primanis
Citations/ SEE ALSO See Also:

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CATALOGING RECORD accessed 10/08

Author Moryson, Fynes, 1566-1630.

Title An itinerary / vvritten by Fynes Moryson gent. first in the Latine tongue, and then translated by him into English: containing his ten yeeres travell throvgh the tvvelve domjnions of Germany, Bohmerland, Sweitzerland, Netherland, Denmarke, Poland, Jtaly, Turky, France, England, Scotland, and Ireland. Diuided into III parts …

Imprint At London : Printed by John Beale ..., 1617

Harry Ransom Center Book Collection -Q- D 915 M89 1617 LIB USE ONLY

Description [16], 295, [1], 301, [1], 292, [2] p. : geneal. tables, maps, plans ; 34 cm. (fol.)

Note Double t.p. (p. [4]-[5] at front).

Parts 1-3 of a projected work of 5 parts; part 4 was written but never printed. Cf. Dict. of Nat. Biog.

This work is known to exist in at least two issues: in this issue, the second title leaf (leaf [par.] 3) has the contents in Roman type and a printer's device with a griffin's head (McKerrow 374) between the contents and imprint; in another issue, leaf [par.] 3 is a cancel with the contents in italics and a different ornamental device is between the contents and imprint.

This issue is known to exist in at least two states: in state 1, part III, book 3 is paged continuously; in state 2, part III, book 3, chapter 4 is omitted, with numbers 151-154 omitted from pagination and gathering 3R consisting of 4 rather than 6 leaves.

HRC copies 1 & 2 are state 1; copy 3 is state 2. TxU-Hu

Signatures: ?[?par.?]??-4D?E?

First word of title within ornamental frame; ornamental device at head of second t.p.

Head- and tail-pieces; historiated initials.

Leaves A3, Ee2, Gg2 and Mmm missigned B3, E2, G2 and Nnn respectively; leaves 4A2 and 4B1 unsigned.

Numerous errors in pagination.

Pages [1]-[2] at front, p. [1] following p. 295, p. [1] following p. 301 and p. [1]-[2] at end are blank.

Indexed in: STC (2nd ed.) 18205

Local note HRC copy 1 [PAR] signed binding (stamped on front turn in): Bound for William Brown, Edinburgh; bookplate of Edward Alexander Parsons; imperfect: blank first and last leaves wanting, p. [11]-[12] at front bound in reverse order. Copy 2 [PAR] bookplate of Edward Alexander Parsons; armorial bookplate of James Maidment; inscribed: Tho: Baker Coll: Jo: Socius ejectus; ms. notations in hand of Baker; bookseller's ms. notation: from Earl Morton's collection; imperfect: blank first and last leaves wanting, part III, p. 139-142 wanting. Copy 3: armorial bookplate of Baron Caher; inscribed: Glengall; inscribed: Townshend; early 19th century English diced calf binding with the crest of Richard Butler, 1st Earl of Glengall; reg. no. 4470; imperfect: blank first leaf wanting; ms. notations.

Subject Europe – Description and travel.

Tyrone's Rebellion, 1597-1603.

Genre Armorial bindings – Glengall, Richard Butler, Earl of, 1775-1819

Bookbinding – Great Britain – ca. 1810

Diced leather bindings – ca. 1810

Special collection: Beale, John, printer/press

Brown, William, binder

Maidment, James, 1795?-1879, former owner

Baker, Thomas, 1656-1740, former owner

Morton, George Douglas, Earl of, 1761-1827, former owner

Glengall, Richard Butler, Earl of, 1775-1819, former owner

Townshend, former owner

Caher, Baron, former owner

Parsons, Edward Alexander, 1878-1962, former owner

Parsons Library

OCLC number 16505856H

Divinity calf


Dogale commission

Drawer handle tool

Example 1


Example 2


Duodo

"A style of binding that carries an allover design of small, leafy ovals with flowers in the center and, sometimes, a coat of arms in the central oval of the group. It was a style favored by and named for Pietro Duodo, Venetian ambassador to Henry IV of France, who had a number of the bindings made for him by Parisian binders from 1594 to 1597." (Miller 2014, 450)

Durham

Edward of Halifax

Elizabethan

Embossed

"A binding of any material that has had an artificial grain, design, or pattern blocked or embossed onto the surface using an embosser or embossing (graining) machine." (Miller 2014, 451)

Embroidered

"A style of needlework binding that appeared as early as the thirteenth century, originally as luxury bindings made for royalty, wealthy clergy or laymen, or for religious institutions. Embroidered bindings became popular as a luxury possession among the well-to-do during the first half of the seventeenth century in England and remained popular until the end of the century. The bindings are often found on small devotional works, and the fully embroidered designs are usually worked on a canvas substrate. When rich fabrics such as velvet formed the substrate, the embroidery covered smaller areas of the cover. Silk threads, pearls, and sequins were all used for the decorations. The designs are often heraldic, pictorial, or floral, and employ a variety of stitches." (Miller 2014, 451)

Etruscan

"A decorative style popular from around 1775 to 1820 that combined the warm brown and terra-cotta colors of calf with tree marbling, and black- and gold-tooled borders incorporating classical motifs. See neoclassical binding." (Miller 2014, 452)

Example 1


Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

BINDING DESCRIPTION
COVER material/hardware, etc corner style/turn ins repairs  
BOARDS material back cornering  
SPINE rounding/ backing lining  
ENDBANDS style material/color core material  
SEWING style #stations support material lacing in  
ENDPAPERS material # of flyleaves/attachment  
TEXT BLOCK material edge treatment  
DECORATION style  
describer (s) Baughman, Metzger, Primanis
University of Texas Cataloging Record


Example 2


Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

BINDING DESCRIPTION
COVER material/hardware, etc corner style/turn ins repairs  
BOARDS material back cornering  
SPINE rounding/ backing lining  
ENDBANDS style material/color core material  
SEWING style #stations support material lacing in  
ENDPAPERS material # of flyleaves/attachment  
TEXT BLOCK material edge treatment  
DECORATION style  
describer (s) Baughman, Metzger, Primanis
University of Texas Cataloging Record


Fan

"A fan binding is any binding that has at least a quarter part of a fan used as part of its decoration. Some bindings only have quarter fans at the corners, or quarter fans combined with a full-wheel design in the center of the cover. Cortina bindings can also be considered fan bindings. See cortina bindings, Scottish wheel bindings, Scottish fan bindings and wheel-and-fan bindings. (Miller 2014, 453-4)

Fanfare

"An elaborate style of decoration consisting generally of geometrically formed compartments of varying sizes, each bounded by a ribbon consisting of a single fillet on one side and a double fillet on the other, each of which, with the exception of the center compartment (which is larger or otherwise distinguished), being filled with leafy spirals, branches of laurel, and other sprays, floral tools..." [9]

An example of a fanfare style binding is available on the National Library of Sweden's Flickr page.

Fides panel

Fishscale

Floral

Fonthill

"A distinctive style of binding associated with Fonthill Abbey in England in the late eighteenth century. Features of bindings in the collection include: sewn on raised cords, half bindings of olive-brown goatskin with marbled-paper sides, lettered and dated on the spines, marbled endpapers, and head edges gilt." (Miller 2014, 455-6)

Fortuna

Frame

French 17th century


Gift Book

Gilt

Girdle

German (1479)

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):


BINDING DESCRIPTION
COVER material/hardware, etc corner style/turn ins repairs  
BOARDS material back cornering  
SPINE rounding/ backing lining  
ENDBANDS style material/color core material  
SEWING style #stations support material lacing in  
ENDPAPERS material # of flyleaves/attachment  
TEXT BLOCK material edge treatment  
DECORATION style  
describer (s) Baughman, Metzger, Primanis
University of Texas Cataloging Record

Golden Fleece motif

"A binding that is decorated with a Golden-Fleece tool (a ram's fleece suspended by a rope) in gold, often at the four corners of the boards, in the center of the boards, or in each spine compartment." (Miller 2014, 459)

Gothic

"A term to describe the dominant binding style in the West from the thirteenth century until the seventeenth century, and in some countries, even later. Elements of the bindings include: parchment or paper text blocks sewn on raised supports laced over into beveled wooden boards that are often covered in alum-tawed skin and decorated with blind tooling and panel stamping." (Miller 2014, 459)

Greek style

"The style is descended from Coptic binding structure and style, and in turn spread into areas that fell under Byzantine rule. Greek binding incorporated the following elements: notched sections, recessed unsupported-link sewing, flush wooden boards that often had grooved edges, rounded, smooth spines lined with cloth, chevron endbands that continued onto the board shoulders, red or brown goatskin of calf, tongue-style corner turn-ins, blind tooled, braid and pin fastenings, bosses, and decorated edges." (Miller 2014, 459)

Grolier

Grolieresque

Halifax

Harlein

"A style of English decorated binding that appeared around 1720, originally used for bindings in the library of Robert Harley and his son. The bindings are of red goatskin, gold tooled with a triple fillet line run around the covers, a broad decorative border tooled inside that, and a centerpiece built up with small ornamental tools." (Miller 2014, 460)

Heads in medallions

Herringbone, Scottish

Hollis

"Bindings that were made for philanthropist Thomas Hollis in the eighteenth century. The books were works on the theme of liberty, and Hollis had them made as presentation copies for libraries. The bindings were decorated with emblematic tools such as the figure of Britannia or Liberty." (Miller 2014, 461)

Initials

Insect motifs

Interlacing ribbon/strapwork

Islamic

Jansenist

"The Jansenists were a society devoted to the ideals of personal holiness and austerity, and the late-seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century bindings named for them had plain covers but, often surprisingly, elaborately tooled doublures." (Miller 2014, 463)

Jewelled

"A term for treasure binding produced from the sixth to fourteenth century. Such bindings were actually the work of the jeweler, the goldsmith, and the silversmith who together created a gorgeous shell of a cover that was then attached to equally beautiful texts. Jeweled bindings were occasionally revived in the nineteenth century for deluxe bindings; the binding firm of Sanngorski and Sutcliffe in England specialized in the style." (Miller 2014, 463)

Kermes stained

Knotwork/ropework

Lace

"A style of embellishment of leather bindings introduced in France in the 18th century. The border in use in the 17th century was enlarged until it became the predominant element of the design, so much so that often only space for an armorial shield was left. Edges, which formerly had been straight, were now tooled in a wavy pattern, thus giving a "lacy" effect at times described as "à la dentelle," but actually looking more like the wrought ironwork of fancy balconies and gates. The style was very popular and was used by many bookbinders and gilders.including the Derome family and Pierre-Paul Dubisson, who used metal plates instead of tools,so as to be able to block the design and thus increase production. " [10]

Law binding

"A term applied to a binding style that became fairly standard around 1830 for law books consisting of a full-leather binding of light-colored sheepskin with laced-on boards, and red- and black-leather lettering pieces blocked in gold on the spine. A similar style of case binding for law books, with tan buckram and the same style of lettering, succeeded the leather version." (Miller 2014, 466)

Law calf

"A cream-colored vegetable-tanned calfskin with a smooth grain surface, at one time used in covering the better grades of law books, but now largely superseded by buckram. Also called "fair calf," and, incorrectly, law sheep."[11]

Lettered cover, initials or titles

Library Style

"A book that is sewn through the folds, usually on(four) tapes but sometimes on the same number ofcords, and has split boards, a leather spine withvellum tips, cloth or paper sides, and Frenchjoints" [12]

London

Lozenge

"A diamond-shaped stamp, or a square stamp turned 45° on its axis, and used in decorating bookbindings." [13]

Lucrece panel

Lyonnaise

Macabre, funerary motifs

"A somber style of binding made for Henri III decorated with symbols of mortality such as skeletons, skulls, and crossbones. Similar bindings were made for adherents of a society founded by Henri III are called penitential bindings. (Miller 2014, 469)

Marguerite

Marius Michel style

Masonic

"A binding on a Masonic text that is decorated with emblems derived from Masonic symbols; examples include English Masonic leather bindings of the eighteenth century and American Masonic bindings of the nineteenth century." (Miller 2014, 470)

Mauchline

"A style of novelty binding associated with the eponymous town (pronounced Moch'lin) in Scotland where a line of Mauchline-ware was produced for tourists to the region, as well as widely exported to the rest of Britain and around the world. The Scottish ware bears scenes from the area, often combined with portraits or other references to the poet Robert Burns. The Mauchline manufacturers carried on a flourishing trade making souvenirs for tourist sites outside of Scotland, included wooden covered notebooks with transfer scenes of Mt. Washington for tourists viewing New Hampshire. Mauchline bindings usually have leather or cloth spines and sycamore wooden boards decorated in a variety of styles including fern ware, tartan ware, transfer ware, photographic ware, and black lacquer ware, finished with several coats of copal varnish." (Miller 2014, 470)

Mearne

Medallions

Miniature

Monastic

Mosaic

Mottled calf

Mudejar

Northumbrian

Nuremberg or Koberger

Oriental

Oxford

Paine

Panel

Panel stamped

Descriptive Bibliography (expand to read):

COLLECTION Courtesy of the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas, Austin
 
BINDING DESCRIPTION
BINDING TERM  
DECORATION  
REPAIRS  
COVER material/hardware, etc, corner style/turn ins, repairs  
BOARDS material, back cornering  
SPINE rounding/ backing lining  
ENDBANDS style, material/color, core material  
SEWING style, # stations, support material lacing in  
ENDPAPERS material, # of flyleaves/attachment  
TEXT BLOCK material, edge treatment  
HOUSING  
NOTES  
DESCRIBER (s) Meaghan J. Brown, M. Baughman, O. Primanis
Citations/ SEE ALSO See Also: Paper descriptions: Elizabeth Lunning and Roy Perkinson. The Print Council of America Paper Sample Book: A Practical Guide to the Description of Paper. The Print Council of America. Sun Hill Press, 1996.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS CATALOGING RECORD accessed 10/08

Papier-mache

Pastiche

Peasant binding

Persian

Pictorial

Plain

Plaquette

Plateresque

Pocket book

Pointille

Presentation

Prize Binding

Publisher's cloth

Renaissance wrapper binding

Restoration

Rococo

Romanesque

Romantique

Roxburghe

Royal binding

Salisbury

Semis

"An heraldic term indicating a form of decoration consisting of a scattered (sown) pattern of diminutive figures—flowers, leaves, sprays, etc., often repeated at regular intervals by means of one, two, or three small tools, resulting in a sort of powdered effect. Sometimes a coat of arms, or other vignette, is added in the center of the cover, or at the corners. There may also be a tooled fillet around the edges of the cover. Early examples of this style date from 1560 on books bound for Charles IX of France."


An example of a binding with au semé decoration can be found on the National Library of Sweden's Flickr page. [14]

Sombre, blind tooled on black

Spanish calf

Spes

Tipos populares

Trade binding

Treasure

Tree calf

Velvet

Wheel, Scottish

White Libraries

Winchester

References

Miller, Julia. 2014. Books Will Speak Plain: a Handbook for Identifying and Describing Historical Bindings. 2nd ed. Ann Arbor, Mich. : Legacy Press.


  1. [1], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "All-over style". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  2. [2], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Armorial Bindings (armorial panels)". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  3. [3], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Azured tool". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  4. [4], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Cambridge style". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  5. 5.0 5.1 [5], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Cathedral bindings". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  6. [6], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Chippendale bindings". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  7. [7], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Cosway bindings". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  8. [8], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Cottage style (cottage roof)". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  9. [9], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Fanfare style". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 15 August 2014.
  10. [10], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Lace Binding". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  11. [11], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Law Calf". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  12. [12], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Library Style Book". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  13. [13], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Lozenge". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 21 July 2014.
  14. [14], Roberts, Matt T. and Etherington. "Library Style Book". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books, A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. 1994. Web. 15 August 2014.

Further Reading


Miller, Julia. 2014. Books Will Speak Plain: a Handbook for Identifying and Describing Historical Bindings. 2nd ed. Ann Arbor, Mich. : Legacy Press.

Describes many decorative motifs and styles used in bookbinding, especially in the Glossary.
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