Works Cited and Further Reading

From Wiki

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Note: The section titles below refer to the previous locations of these citations and resources. In many cases they are no longer accurate but are being kept, for the time being, until a larger citation formatting project can be undertaken.

From various places

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences Green Labs Program, Harvard University [1].

The Harvard Lab Sustainability Guide [2] [Accessed 02/22/2014].

This Department of Labor/OSHA website entitled 'Transitioning to Safer Chemicals' has a good bibliography on the topic of transitioning to safer chemicals. [3]

Resource Center, Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE): http://www.aashe.org/resources

Sutton, Sarah. Environmental sustainability at historic sites and museums. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015. ISBN: 9780759124158. The author provides case studies from museums at the forefront of the green movement

Getting Greener and Creating the Optimal: The State of Sustainability Research and the Preservation Environment By Jeremy Linden, Preservation Environment Specialist, Image Permanence Institute. Published in the March 2012 Vol. 37, No. 2 issue of AIC News.

Conference Review, "Climate Change and Museum Collections, IIC Conference, London, September 2008." Published in AIC NEWS, January 2009.

From Sustainable Solvent Use

Chris Stavroudis. 2010. Personal communication

Dale Kronkright. 2010. Personal communication

Debra Daly-Hartin. 2010. Personal communication

Chris Stavroudis. 2000. Solvent/Hazardous Materials Usage Survey

Information on the Scorecard Pollution Rating System and EPA solvent recycling program was based on telephone conversations and emails with Sharon Austin, US EPA, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics Chemical Engineering Branch, Washington, DC.

Christian Capello, Ulrich Fischer and Konrad Hungerbuhler. 2007. “What is a Green Solvent? A Comprehensive Framework for the Environmental Assessment of Solvents.” www.rsc.org/greenchem (February). [4]

citation to Monona Rossol’s The Artists’ Complete Health and Safety Guide, esp. pg 95 with a table called Common Solvents and their Hazards


From 1.1 Introduction to Sustainability

Brophy, S. S., & Wylie, E. 2013. The green museum: A primer on environmental practice. New York, NY: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Brutland, Gro. 1987. Our Common Future: the World Commission on Environment and Development. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Parr, Adrian. 2009. Hijacking Sustainability Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

For a longer bibliography on sustainability in conservation and museums, see the following webpage on the American Institute for Conservation site:[5]

From 1.2 A History of Sustainability in Museums and Cultural Institutions

Abbey, Heidi N. “The Green Archivist: A Primer for Adopting Affordable, Environmentally Sustainable, and Socially Responsible Archival Management Practices.” Archival Issues: Journal of the Midwest Archives Conference. Accessed online via EBSCO on 1/15/2014.

The author bases her definition of sustainability on the much-cited United Nations' World Commission on Environmental and Development report, which first articulated the need to balance present-day development against the continuing needs of future generations. After briefly describing the history of the environmental movement at large in the U.S., the article focuses on a succinct and valuable history of the "Green Library Movement" and the "Green Museum Movement," with a literature review of sustainability scholarship in the library and museum fields. Abbey's description of the lack of momentum in an archives-specific sustainability movement comes across as somewhat forced, given the integration of the library and archives field. (Note: at the time of this article's publication, the author herself held the position of "Archivist and Humanities Reference Librarian" in an academic library.) Abbey somewhat dismissively acknowledges that most efforts are currently focused on sustainable environments for cultural institutions, and calls for a move beyond infrastructure changes to a more pragmatic action plan for archivists. The article's final five pages, "Sustainability Framework and Tools: Practical Initiatives and Resources for Archivists" actually addresses these concerns rather abstractly, although they are a good, basic overview for institutions just beginning to develop a sustainable mindset.

From 1.5 Conferences, workshops, webcasts

This list of conferences, workshops, and webcasts is organized by date. To notify the CSCP of a conference or workshop that belongs on this list, please contact us at [email protected]

November 19-22, 2013. Display Cases - Preservation, Sustainability, and Design [6]. Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

May 19-22. 2013 AAM Annual meeting and Museum Expo. Baltimore, MD. There will be a session lead by Sarah Brophy entitled, "Small(er) and Green(er): Sustainability on a Limited Budget."[7]

April 11- 12, 2013. Heritage Science and Sustainable Development for the Preservation of Art and Cultural Assets - On the Way to the Green Museum. Hosted by the Rathgen Research Laboratory at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Full conference video recordings.

March 5 - 6, 2013. Strengthening Collections | Strengthening Collaborations: Summit on the Museum Preservation Environment. Hosted by the Smithsonian Institute at the National Museum of the American Indian. Talks cover topics including the history of environmental monitoring, risk assessment, standards and best practices. Video Recording.

March 1, 2013. Gallery Illumination: LED Lighting in Today's Museums. Hosted by the Lunder Conservation Center at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Talks cover topics ranging from introducing LED lighting, measuring cost effectiveness of LED lights, interpreting the color rendering index, among other subjects. Summary: [8] Video: [9]

2013 Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments - Series II hosted by the Image Permanence Institute (Webinar Information). The website includes resources, videos, and information about the workshop series.

April 2011. The Green Museum: An Online Conference. The American Association of Museums.

January 2011. Sustainability and Heritage in a World of Change. The Getty Conservation Institute. [10]

2007. From Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments [11] A two-day symposium to examine sustainable practices in cultural heritage preservation environments, hosted by the Kilgarlin Center for Preservation of the Cultural Record at the University of Texas, Austin.

April 2007. Experts' Roundtable on Sustainable Climate Management Strategies. The Getty Conservation Institute. Tenerife, Spain. The transcript[12]and papers presented [13]are digitally accessible.

From 1.4 Blogs and Websites

Diassembled LED light from WikiMedia Commons, author Dantor

Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. [14]

California Association of Museums [15] Though obviously geared toward California, the Green Museum Initiatives is a great website with good information including practical tips to help improve museum sustainability and green practices.

Conservation Physics by Tim Padfield [16] Articles such as 'Humidity buffer capacity of selected building materials' and 'Fundamental microclimate concepts.'

The Getty Conservation Institute: Alternative Climate Controls for Historic Buildings. 2003-2010. [17]

Green Museum - Wikipedia page [18]

Sustainable Heritage blog [19]

Sustainable Museums. A blog by Sarah Brophy, a LEED-AP certified sustainability advisor. [20]

Sustainability and Museums. Museums Association (UK). [21]

Reviewing Environmental Conditions: NMDC Guiding Principles for Reducing Museums' Carbon Footprint. National Museums Directors' Conference (UK). [22]

From 3.6


K. Alfonsi, J. Colberg, P. J. Dunn, T. Fevig, S. Jennings, T. A. Johnson, H. P. Kleine, C. Knight, M. A. Nagy, D. A. Perry and M. Stefaniak. Green chemistry tools to influence a medicinal chemistry and research chemistry based organisation, Green Chemistry, 2008, 10, 3136, DOI: 10.1039/b711717e

C. Capello, U. Fischer, K. Hungerbhler, What is a green solvent? A comprehensive framework for the environmental assessment of solvents, Green Chemistry, 2007, 9, 927934, DOI: 10.1039/b617536h

A.D Curzons, D.C. Constable, V.L. Cunningham. Solvent selection guide: a guide to the integration of environmental, health and safety criteria into the selection of solvents. Clean Products and Processes 1 (1999) 82–90 Q Springer-Verlag 1999. [23]

M. Debia, D. Bégin, M. Gérin, Solvent substitution: an analysis of comprehensive hazard screening indices. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. 2011 Jun;8(6):387-99. doi: 10.1080/15459624.2011.582791.

F.M. Kerten and R. Marriott. Alternative Solvents for Green Chemistry, 2nd ed. The Royal Society of Chemistry, London: 2013.

Nelson, W. H. Green Solvents for Chemistry: Perspectives and Practice. Oxford University Press, USA; 1 edition (March 27, 2003). ISBN-10: 0195157362 /ISBN-13: 978-0195157369

Williams, D. L., Ph.D. (2013, Sept.) Solving the Solvent Substitution Puzzle. Retrieved Feb. 2014 from www.cemag.us. [24]

4.4 References: Environmental Controls

Anderson, C. E., and C. Kestner. 2003. Environmental monitoring and revised environmental standards at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. In Environmental monitoring of our cultural heritage: sustainable conservation solutions. Milton Keyes, U.K.: Environmental Building Solutions, Ltd.

Artigas, David John, 2007. A Comparison of the Efficacy and Costs of Different Approaches to Climate Management in Historic Buildings and Museums. Thesis in Historic Preservation at the University of Pennsylvania. Advisor: Michael C. Henry. [25]

Ashley-Smith, J., N. Umney and D. Ford. 1994. Let’s be honest: realistic environmental parameters for loaned objects. In Preventive Conservation: Practice, Theory and Research. Preprints of the Contributions to the Ottawa Congress, eds. A. Roy and P. Smith. London: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 28-31.

ASHRAE. 2011. Chapter 23: Museums, Galleries, Archives and Libraries. Applications Handbook. Atlanta, GA: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers.[26]

Ayres, J., J. Marx, C. Haiad, and H. Lau. 1988. Energy conservation and climate control in museums. Los Angeles: Ayres Ezer Lau Consulting Engineers.

Brimblecombe, P. 2005. Effects of the cultural environment. In Cultural heritage conservation and environmental impact assessment by non-destructive testing and micro-analysis, eds. R. van Grieken , H. A. Koen and A.A. Balkema. London: Taylor & Francis. 11-18.

British Standards Institution, 2012. PAS 198:2012 Specification for managing environmental conditions for cultural collections [27].

Brophy, Sarah S. and Elizabeth Wylie. The Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Practice, Lanham, M.D: AltaMira Press, 2008.

Brown, J. P. 1994. Hygrometric measurement in museums: calibration, accuracy, and the specification of relative humidity. In Preventive conservation: practice, theory and research. preprints of the contributions to the ottawa congress, eds. A. Roy and P. Smith. London: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 39-43.

Brown, J. and W. Rose. 1996. Humidity and moisture in historic buildings: the origins of building and object conservation. APT Bulletin 27 (3): 12-23.

Bullock, L. 2009. Environmental controls in National Trust properties. Journal of Architectural Conservation. 15 (1): 83-98.

Cassar, M., ed. 1994. Museums, environment, energy. London: HMSO Publications.

Cassar, M. 1995. Environmental management: guidelines for museums and galleries. London and New York: Routledge.

Christoffersen, L. D. 1995. Zephyr: Passive climate controlled repositories. storage facilities for museum, archive and library purposes. Copenhagen, Denmark: National Museum of Denmark Conservation Department.

Conrad, E. A. 1996. Environmental monitoring as a diagnostic tool. In Preservation of collections: assessment, evaluation, and mitigation strategies. Papers presented at the workshop, Norfolk, Virginia, June 10-11, 1996. Washington, D.C.: the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 15-20.

Conrad, E. A. 1995. Balancing environmental needs of the building, the collection, and the user. Norwalk, CT: East Landmark Facilities Group.

Dubin, F. S., H. Mindell and B. Selwyn. 1976. How to save energy and cut costs in existing industrial and commercial buildings: an energy conservation manual. Park Ridge, NJ: Noyes Data Corporation.

Erhardt, D., C. S. Tumosa and M. F. Mecklenburg. 2007. Applying science to the question of museum climate. In Museum Microclimates, eds. T. Padfield and K. Borchersen. Denmark: National Museum of Denmark. www.natmus.dk/graphics/konferencer_mm/microclimates/pdf/erhardt.pdf

Erhardt, D. and M. F. Mecklenburg. 1994. Relative humidity re-examined. In Preventive conservation: practice, theory and research. Preprints of the Contributions to the Ottawa Congress, 12-16 September, 1994, eds. A. Roy and P. Smith. London. 32-38.

Erhardt, D., M.F. Mecklenburg, C.S. Tumosa and M. McCormick-Goodhart. 1995. The determination of allowable RH fluctuations. WAAC Newslettter 17 (1): 19-23.

Erhardt, D., M.F. Mecklenburg, C.S. Tumosa and M. McCormick-Goodhart. 1997. The determination of appropriate museum environments. In British Museum occasional paper number 116: the interface between science and conservation, ed. S. Bradley. London: The British Museum. 153-163.

Fulton, R. 1988. Curators and M&E consulting engineers. Museums Journal 87 (4): 203-205.

Galasiu, A.D. and G.R. Newsham. 2009. Energy savings due to occupancy sensors and personal controls: a pilot field study. Institute for Research in Construction. NRCC-51264. Available online http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/irc/doc/pubs/nrcc51264.pdf.

Grattan, D. and S. Michalski. Environmental guidelines for museums: temperature and relative humidity (RH). www.cci-icc.gc.ca/crc/articles/enviro/index-eng.aspx.

Harris, S. Y. 2001. Building pathology: deterioration, diagnostics and intervention. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Image Permanence Institute, 2012. IPI’s Guide to Sustainable Preservation Practices for Managing Storage Environments [28]. Image Permanence Institute, Rochester, NY.

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. The National Academies Press 2011. (Also available as web publication, PDF form: [29]) Report compiled at the request of the EPA that finds that climate change and some energy-saving 'green' building initiatives may adversely affect indoor air quality.

Jessup, W. C. 1995. Conservation in context: finding a balance for the historic house museum. In Proceedings from the symposium, March 7-8, 1994. Washington, D.C.: The National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Kerschner, R. 1992. A practical approach to environmental requirements for collections in historic buildings. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 31 (1): 65-76

Laurie, A.P. 1935. Atmospheric humidity and works of art. Museums Journal 35: 51-52.

Levin, J., and S. Maekawa. 2007. Passive design, mechanical systems, and doing nothing: a discussion about environmental management. The Getty Conservation Newsletter 22(1). Available through [30]

Lewis, S. R. 1931. Heating and humidifying in museums. Heating Piping and Air Conditioning (November 1931): 910-915.

Lstiburek, J. and J. Carmody. 1993. Moisture control handbook. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Lull, W. P. 1994. Further comments on climate control guidelines. Abbey Newsletter 18 (7): 87-88.

Lull, W. P. 1995. Conservation environment guidelines for libraries and archives. Ottawa: Canadian Council of Archives.

Lyle, J. 1912. Relative humidity. ASHVE Transactions 18.

MacIntyre, J. 1934. Air conditioning for Mangegna’s cartoons at Hampton Court Palace. Technical Studies in the Field of the Fine Arts 2 (April): 171-184.

MacIntyre, J. 1934. Some comments on antiquities and humidity. Museums Journal 33 (February): 419-420.

McCabe, J. Humidification and ventilation in art museums. Museum News, September 1, 1931: 7-8.

McCrady, E. 1994. Temperature and RH guidelines challenged by Smithsonian. Abbey Newsletter 18 (45): 44-45.

Mecklenburg, M.F. Determining the acceptable ranges of relative humidity and temperature in museums and galleries: Part 1, structural response to relative humidity. Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute. www.si.edu/mci/downloads/reports/Mecklenburg-Part1-RH.pdf.

Mecklenburg, M.F. Determining the acceptable ranges of relative humidity and temperature in museums and galleries: Part 2, structural response to temperature. Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute. www.si.edu/mci/downloads/reports/Mecklenburg-Part2-Temp.pdf.

Mecklenburg, M. F., and C. S. Tumosa. 1999. Temperature and relative humidity effects on the mechanical and chemical stability of collections. ASHRAE Journal 41 (4): 69-74.

Mecklenburg, M.F., C.S. Tumosa, and A. Pride. 2004. Preserving Legacy Buildings. ASHRAE Journal 46 (6): S18-S23.

Mecklenburg, M.F., C.S. Tumosa, and D. Erhardt. 1994. Structural response of painted wood surfaces to changes in ambient relative humidity. In Painted Wood: history and conservation. Proceedings of a symposium organized by the Wooden Artifacts Group of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works and the Foundation of the AIC, eds. V. Dorge and F. C. Howeltt. Los Angeles: The Getty Conservation Institute. 464-483.

Mecklenburg, M.F., C.S. Tumosa, and M.H. McCormick-Goodhart. 1995. A general model relating externally applied forces to environmentally induced stresses in materials. Art and Archaeology 4 (352): 285-292.

Mecklenburg, M.F., C.S. Tumosa, and N. Wyplosz. 1995. The effects of relative humidity on the structural response of selected wood samples in the cross grain direction. Art and Archaeology 4 (352): 305-324.

Michalski, S. 1991. Paintings: their response to temperature, relative humidity, shock and vibration. In Art in Transit: Studies in the Transport of Paintings, ed. M. F. Mecklenburg. Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art. 223-248.

Michalski, S. 1993. Relative humidity: a discussion of correct/incorrect values. Preprints of ICOM Committee for Conservation, 10th Triennial Meeting, Washington, D.C. Paris: ICOM-CC. 624-628.

Michalski, S. 1993. Relative humidity in museums, galleries, and archives: specification and control. In Bugs, mold and rot II: a workshop on control of humidity for health, artifacts, and buildings, eds. W. B. Rose and A. TenWolde. Washington, D.C.: The National Institute of Building Sciences. 51-62.

Michalski, S. 1994. Relative humidity and temperature guidelines: what's happening? CCI Newsletter (14): 6-8.

Michalski, S. 1996. Quantified Risk Reduction in the Humidity Dilemma. APT Bulletin 27 (3): 25–29.

Michalski, S. 1999. Climate control priorities and solutions for collections in historic buildings. Forum 12 (4): 8-14.

Michalski, S. 2000. Guidelines for humidity and temperature in Canadian archives. Canadian Conservation Institute. Technical bulletin 23. 20.

Michalski, S. 2002. Double the life for each five-degree drop, more than double the life for each halving of relative humidity. In ICOM Committee for Conservation Preprints volume 1. 13th Triennial Meeting, Rio de Janeiro, ed. R. Vontobel. London: James & James. 66-72.

Michalski, S. 2004. Care and preservation of collections. In Running a museum: a practical handbook, ed. P. Boylan. Paris: International Council of Museums & UNESCO. 51-90.

Michalski, S. The Ideal climate, risk management, the ASHRAE chapter, proofed fluctuations and toward a full risk analysis model.” Contribution to the Experts’ Roundtable on Sustainable Climate Management Strategies, April 2007, Tenerife, Spain. www.getty.edu/conservation/science/climate/paper_michalski.pdf.

Michalski, S. and James Reilly. 1996. Environmental Standards: defining norms for large and varied collections. In Preservation of collections: Assessment, Evaluation, and Mitigation Strategies. Washington, D.C.: The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 28-33.

Oreszczyn, T., M. Cassar and K. Fernandez. 1994. Comparative study of air-conditioned and non air-conditioned museums. In Preventive conservation: practice, theory and research. Preprints of the contributions to the ottawa congress, eds. A. Roy and P. Smith. London: International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 144-148.

Padfield, T. 1990. Low-energy climate control in museum stores. ICOM Committee for Conservation Preprints. 9th Triennial Meeting, Paris. 596-601.

Padfield, T. An introduction to the physics of the museum environment. [31]

Padfield, T. and K. Borchersen, eds. 2007. Museum microclimates. Copenhagen, Denmark: National Museum of Denmark. [32]

Paine, S. R. 1985 How to control environmental conditions in historical agencies and museums. Technical Information Service of the American Association for State and Local History, Technical Report 3.

Park, S. C. 1991. Heating, ventilating, and cooling historic buildings: problems and recommended approaches. Technical Preservation Services, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, Preservation Brief 24. www.nps.gov/history/hps/TPS/briefs/brief24.htm.

Park, S. C. 1999. HVAC for historic buildings. ASHRAE Journal 41 (4): 91-98.

Podany, J., M. C. Henry, M. Cassar, S. Staniforth, N. Serota, C. and R. Sabbioni and M. James. 2008. Climate change and museum collections. Studies in Conservation 53: 287-297.

Rawlins, F.I.G. 1942. The control of temperature and humidity in relation to works of art. Museums Journal 41: 279-283.

Rogers, G. deW. 1976. The ideal of the ideal environment. Journal of the International Institute for Conservation, Canadian Group 2 (1): 34-49.

Rosenberg, G. 1933. Antiquities and humidity. Museums Journal 33 (December): 307-350.

Rosenberg, G. 1934. Reply to some comments on antiquities and humidity. Museums Journal 33 (February): 419-420.

Smallcombe, W. 1934. Standard air conditions and dust problems. Museums Journal (April 1934): 39-40.

Thomson, G. 1986. The museum environment, 2nd Edition. London: Butterworth/Heinemann.

Tumosa, C.S., D. Erhardt, M.F. Mecklenburg, and M. McCormick-Goodhard. 1995. The effects of relative humidity and temperature on exhibited objects. ICOM-CC Study Series (1): 9.

Weintraub, S. 2006. The museum environment: transforming the solution into a problem. Collections: A Journal for Museum and Archives Professionals 2 (3): 195-218.

Williams, M. 1994. Fresh-air climate conditioning at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum. In Care of collections, ed. S. Knell. London: Routledge. 107-116.

4.5 Exhibitions

Eco-Friendly Exhibiting [33] An article from March 2007 in Exhibitor Magazine.

ExhibitSEED Green Exhibits Checklist [34]

Green Exhibits [35]

4.6 Lighting

Lull, W.P. 2008. Everything old is new again: what works, what does not work. Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments Symposium Proceedings. Available online [16]

Pfeiffer, P.L. 2008. Real and relevant green building. Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments Symposium Proceedings. Available online [18]

Swisher, J., et. al. 1994. Dynamics of energy efficient lighting. Energy Policy 22(7): 581-594.

4.8 References

Anderson, C. E., and C. Kestner. 2003. Environmental monitoring and revised environmental standards at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. In Environmental monitoring of our cultural heritage: sustainable conservation solutions. Milton Keyes, U.K.: Environmental Building Solutions, Ltd.

Ayers, et al. 1988. Energy Conservation and Climate Control in Museums. Los Angeles: Ayers Ezer Lau Consulting Engineers.

Brimblecombe, P. 2005. Effects of the Cultural Environment. In Cultural heritage conservation and environmental impact assessment by non-destructive testing and microanalysis. eds van Grieken, René and Janssens, Koen H.A. London: A.A. Balkema

Bullock, L. 2009. Environmental controls in National Trust properties. Journal of Architectural Conservation. 15 (1): 83-98.

de Silva, Megan and Jane Henderson. 2011. Sustainablity in Conservation Practice. Journal of the Institute of Conservation. 34 (1): 5-15. [36]

Erhardt, D., C. S. Tumosa and M. F. Mecklenburg. 2007. Applying science to the question of museum climate. In Museum Microclimates, eds. T. Padfield and K. Borchersen. Denmark: National Museum of Denmark. [37]

Kerschner, R. 1992. A practical approach to environmental requirements for collections in historic buildings. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation 31 (1): 65-76

Levin, J., and S. Maekawa. 2007. Passive design, mechanical systems, and doing nothing: a discussion about environmental management. The Getty Conservation Newsletter 22(1). Available online at [38]

Lull, W.P. 2008. Everything old is new again: what works, what does not work. Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments Symposium Proceedings. Available online [39]

Michalski, S. 1993. Relative humidity in museums, galleries, and archives: Specification and control. In Bugs, Mold and Rot II: A workshop on control of humidity for health, artifacts, and buildings. Proceedings, eds. W. B. Rose, and A. TenWolde. Washington, D.C.: The National Institute of Building Sciences. 51-62.

National Park Service, online article. "Illustrated Guidelines on Sustainability for Renovating Historic Buildings." [40]

Pfeiffer, P.L. 2008. Real and relevant green building. Gray Areas to Green Areas: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments Symposium Proceedings. Available online [41]

Rawlins, F.I.G. 1942. The control of temperature and humidity in relation to works of art. Museums Journal 41: 279-283.

Silence, P. 2012. Phone conversation/email with Melissa Tedone on February 10, 2012.

Wikipedia Contributors. 2012. Energy Conservation. Accessed 28 January 2012 04:41 UTC. [42]

4.9 Further Reading about Facility-Wide Considerations

Brophy, Sarah S. and Elizabeth Wylie. The Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Practice, Lanham, M.D: AltaMira Press, 2008.

Burmester, A. 2005. Visions for a new museum: the Museum Brandhorst. Studies in Conservation 50.

Butts, Susan H. et al, ed. 2011. Health and Safety for Museum Professionals. Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections and the Health & Safety Committee of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. (Chapter 6: Environmental Protection)

de Silva, M. 2009. Steps towards environmental sustainability in museums & conservation. Presentation at Welsh Libraries Archives and Museums Conference, May 21 – 22, 2009. [43]

Getty Conservation Institute. 2008. Climate change and preserving cultural heritage in the 21st Century. Video, 90 minutes. [44]

Hughes, S., ed. 2008. Climate change and museum collections. Presented at IIC Conference, London. [45]

Kibert, C. J. (2005). Sustainable construction: Green building design and delivery. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Lull, R. 1924. The new Peabody Museum. Part I – building and equipment. Museum Work 7: 109-117.

MacIntyre, J. 1934. Comments on antiquities and humidity. Museums Journal 33 (March): 459-460.

Matthai, R. ed. 1979. Protection of cultural properties during energy emergencies & energy conservation and historic preservation. New York: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Economic Development Administration, Technical Assistance Project.

Stolow, N. 1994. The preservation of historic houses and sites: the interface of architectural restoration and collection/display conservation principles. In Preventive conservation: practice, theory and research. Preprints of the contributions to the Ottawa Congress, 12-16 September. London: International Institute for Conservation. 116-122.

Swisher, J., et. al. 1994. Dynamics of energy efficient lighting. Energy Policy 22(7): 581-594.

Taylor, T. H., ed. 1996 Museums in historic buildings. APT Bulletin: The Journal of Preservation Technology 27 (3): 7-64.

From the conservation-us.org Bibliography and Web Resources webpage

Museums

Brophy, Sarah S. and Elizabeth Wylie. The Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Practice, Lanham, M.D: AltaMira Press, 2008.* A practical guide to assist museum staff in incorporating “green” into both new buildings and into day to day operations. Numerous case studies illustrate steps. Information on conducting energy audits.

Keniry, Julian. Ecodemia: Campus Environmental Stewardship at the Turn of the 21st Century. Washington, DC: National Wildlife Federation, 1995. While this book focuses on environmental initiatives on college campuses, some of the suggestions might translate to a museum or other institutional setting.

From Grey Areas to Green Area: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments, Symposium Proceedings* Kilgarlin Symposium on developing sustainable practices in preservation environments. How to balance preservation concerns with sustainability practices. Raises question of ‘if conservation uses “green” materials, what is the impact on collections?’

Buildings / Construction

Kibert, C. J. (2005). Sustainable construction: Green building design and delivery. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Describes the best practices in sustainable construction using the LEED rating system and other tools.

Mendler, Sandra, Odell, William, & Mary Ann Lazurus. (2006). The HOK guidebook to sustainable design.2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. A guidebook to the LEED design process.

Brophy, Sarah S. and Elizabeth Wylie. The Green Museum: A Primer on Environmental Practice, Lanham, M.D: AltaMira Press, 2008.* A practical guide to assist museum staff in incorporating “green” into both new buildings and into day to day operations. Numerous case studies illustrate steps. Information on conducting energy audits.

Jones, Louis. Environmentally Responsible Design: Green and Sustainable Design for Interior Designers. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, 2008. Describes innovations in sustainable interior design.. With information on lighting design, indoor air quality, interior finishes, energy use, and LEED certification.

Energy Star Programs and Products Government resource site for products, buildings, home improvement and repair. Templates for energy management. Publication “Putting Energy into Profits (pdf) offers good tips for business owners on implementing steps to manage energy costs.

Energy / Environmental Management

Wilson, Alex, and John Morrill. Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings. Rev. ed. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, 1998. Practical guide to energy-saving techniques, with energy ratings for appliances, light bulbs, water heaters, windows, heating systems, and more

Alternative Climate Controls for Historic Buildings (Conservation at the Getty)* Getty Roundtable discussion on climate controls for historic sites. Interdisciplinary dialogue of authors from around the world discussing problems and solutions. Individual papers available.

Canadian Conservation Institute* A preventive conservation manual with up-to-date environmental guidelines.

Energy Star Programs and Products Government resource site for products, buildings,home improvement and repair. Templates for energy management. Publication “Putting Energy into Profits (pdf) offers good tips for business owners on implementing steps to manage energy costs.

From Grey Areas to Green Area: Developing Sustainable Practices in Preservation Environments, Symposium Proceedings* Kilgarlin Symposium on developing sustainable practices in preservation environments. How to balance preservation concerns with sustainability practices. Raises question of ‘if conservation uses “green” materials, what is the impact on collections?’

The Natural Resources Defense Council Tips for conserving electricity

Image Permanence Institute* IPI’s e-newsletter with climate notes, including a dew-pint calculator.

US Department of Energy Following the various links on this site will lead you to information such as: purchasing energy-efficient products, laws and regulations, energy-efficient building design, water- and energy-use calculators, conferences, etc.

Chemistry

Anastas, Paul and John Warner, Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice, Oxford University Press: New York, 1998. Introduces the principals of conducting environmentally benign chemistry.

Nicholson, John W., The Chemistry of Polymers. Royal Society of Chemistry; 2nd rev. and exp. ed. edition (May 8, 2003). Chapter 10: Polymers and the Environment Chapter 10 of this in-depth book on polymer chemistry discusses the impact that plastics have on the environment and human health.

Stevens, E.S, Green Plastics. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2002. Describes the chemistry of bioplastics.

Wargo, John. Green Intelligence. Yale University Press. 2009. A discussion of the hazards of synthetic chemicals on human health and the environment.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry A federal, public health agency that provides fact sheets about the use, handling, and disposal of toxic substances.

Energy Star Programs and Products Government resource site for products, buildings,home improvement and repair. Templates for energy management. Publication “Putting Energy into Profits (pdf) offers good tips for business owners on implementing steps to manage energy costs.

Environmental Chemistry Articles and resources on chemicals in the environment written by scientists. Contains information on topics such as household chemicals, recycling, hazmat response and water pollution.

MIT Green Wizard This database provides information on alternatives to hazardous chemicals or processes. Choose one of four starting points: to replace a chemical currently in use, click Chemical to Replace (e.g. Alternative to carbon tetrachloride); to modify or replace a processes, click Process to Replace. (e.g. flash chromography-alternative solvents or alternative processes); if you've heard of an alternative chemical and would like to search on that, click Alternative Chemicals. (e.g., superficial fluids); if you've heard of an alternative process and would like to know more, click Alternative Process.

12 Principles of Green Chemistry Link to PowerPoint presentation entitled ‘Educating environmentally responsible citizens and scientists through green, environmental chemistry. Suggestions for alternatives to hazardous chemicals or procedures.

Health & Toxins

Baker, Nena. The Body Toxic, North Point Press.2008 Provides a more personal look at the chemical burdens imposed on our bodies by common products.

Blanc, Paul. How Everyday Products Make People Sick: Toxins at Home and in the Workplace. University of California Press. 2nd ed. 2009 Describes hidden health dangers in products encountered everyday, some of which may be in your lab.

Nicholson, John W., The Chemistry of Polymers. Royal Society of Chemistry; 2nd rev. and exp. ed. edition (May 8, 2003). Chapter 10: Polymers and the Environment Chapter 10 of this in-depth book on polymer chemistry discusses the impact that plastics have on the environment and human health.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry A federal, public health agency that provides fact sheets about the use, handling, and disposal of toxic substances.

Business & the Workplace

Riordan, John and Kristen Becker. The Good Office: Green Design on the Cutting Edge. Collins Design, HarperCollins Publishers, Inc., New York, 2008. A description of innovations in office design that are more sustainable and better for the worker.

Green Biz The “Business Voice of the Green Economy” includes newsletter, blogs, resources, bookstore, etc. One=stop site for looking at the environment and economy from a business point of view. Publication “Greening Your Business” provides tips and resources including product life cycle information.

National Resources Defense Council Resources for businesses examining their environmental impact.

Protecting the Environment in the Workplace: http://www.epa.gov/epahome/workplac.htm#office EPA page with suggestions for greening the office.

Start-Up Nation Small business resource site. ‘Nine Steps to Greening Your Business’ good basic information on greening your business. Lists solutions and (cost) benefits.

Consumer Choices & Environmental Impact

Brower, Michael, PhD, and Warren Leon, PhD. The Consumer's Guide to Effective Environmental Choices: Practical Advice from the Union of Concerned Scientists. Three Rivers Press; 1st edition (March 30, 1999) Examines the complicated issues surrounding individual environmental choices to help people choose where to best focus their efforts

Earthworks Group, 50 Simple Things You can do to Save the Earth, Earthworks Press, Berkeley, CA, 1989 This classic book of environmental choices still contains suggestions that are worthwhile 20 years later.

Feldman, Andrew J. The Sierra Club Green Guide: Everybody’s Desk Reference to Environmental Information. San Francisco: Sierra Club Books, 1996. An environmental desk reference that helps direct the user to find information on environmental topics

Horn, Greg. Living Green: A Practical Guide to Simple Sustainability. Freedom Press, 2006.

Practical suggestions for reducing our individual impact on the environment.

Rogers, Elizabeth. The Green Book: The Everyday Guide to Saving the Planet One Simple Step at a Time. Three Rivers Press (June 19, 2007) Practical suggestions for reducing our individual impact on the environment.

Ryan, John C. and Alan Thein Durning. Stuff: The Secret Lives of Everyday Things (New Report, No 4). Northwest Environment (January 1, 1997) Documents consumer impact (‘eco-wake’) on the environment.

Trask, Cissy. It's Easy Being Green: A Handbook for Earth-Friendly Living. Gibbs Smith, Publisher; 1 edition (January 23, 2006) General in scope offers practical suggestions for reducing our individual impact on the environment.

Wilson, Alex, and John Morrill. Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings. Rev. ed. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, 1998. Practical guide to energy-saving techniques, with energy ratings for appliances, light bulbs, water heaters, windows, heating systems, and more

The Environmental Working Group This organization conducts scientific analysis of products to help consumers make informed choices. Their most recent research is on the chemicals in cleaning products, describing the health and environmental impacts of the various ingredients and ranking them according to relative safety.

Food & Water Watch A public outreach and lobbying organization that is focused on guiding government policy and individual choices toward more sustainable practices.

Yale Environment 360 Yale Environment 360 is an online magazine offering opinion, analysis, reporting and debate on global environmental issues.

The National Building Museum's Environmental Sustainability Series The National Building Museum’s website provides resources on greener communities (publication available for purchase). Museum shop also has “green” gift ideas.

The Green Guide: Part of the larger National Geographic site. Geared more toward personal steps toward greener practices.

Planning Environmentally Aware Events EPA page with suggestions for environmentally aware events.

Consumer Products

Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool This site helps purchasers evaluate, compare and select electronic products based on their environmental attributes.

Recycling / Waste Management

Ackerman, Frank. Why Do We Recycle? Markets, Values, and Public Policy. Washington, DC: Island Press, 1997. An in-depth examination of the arguments for and against recycling; as well as municipal recycling programs and how they work; and how the marketplace and the law affect recycling programs.

White, Michael, et. al. From Cradle to Grave: Waste Management for Conservators. AIC News Vol 26. No. 6, [Special Insert]. 2001.* An excellent article regarding regulations, pertaining to waste management, for conservators. References and resources also provided.

Co-op America Plastics Guide This page describes what the recycling code on different plastic products means.

Earth 911 Provides local recycling options. Fill in type of waste to be removed and your zip code and it provides resource options

Zero Waste Alliance Strategies for reducing or eliminating waste.

Blogs

These are general environmental sites and may have articles on numerous worthwhile topics.

NewScientist Environmental blog A blog with updates on environmental news and science, brought to you by the publishers of NewScientist Magazine

Treehugger One of the more extensive Environmental blogs, with articles under science & technology and architecture & design being of most interest.