TSG Chapter IV. Documentation of Textiles - Section C. Factors to Consider

From Wiki


Back to Textiles Chapter List

This entry is in the process of being corrected

The Textile Conservation Catalogue
EXAMINATION OF TEXTILES PRIOR TO TREATMENT

C. Factors to consider



Date: April 2, 1998
Compiler: Susan Heald
Contributors: Deborah Trupin, Denise K. Migdail, Gaelen Gorden, Gwen Spicer, Judith Eisenberg, Jane Hutchins, Jane Merritt, Lucy Commoner, Lorna Filippini, Patricia Ewer, Martha Winslow Grimm, Marlene Jaffe, Meredith Montague, Nancy Pollak, Sara Reiter, Suzanne Thomassen-Krauss, Susan Anne Mathisen, Zoe Perkins
Editors: M. Cynthia Hughes, Jane Lynn Merritt, Deborah Trupin, Sara J. Wolf

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
7.1.1 Purpose or reason for examination
7.1.2 Overall condition of the piece
7.1.3 Resources designated to the project
7.1.4 Extent of previous documentation
7.1.5 Standardization of Terminology
7.1.6 Permanence of records
7.1.7 Danger of further damage

Type and extent of the documentation may depend on several factors.

7.1.1 Purpose or reason for examination

a detailed report for an individual object needing specialized treatment vs. a large collection of items needing mass treatment will require different types of reports.

7.1.2 Overall condition of the piece

7.1.3 Resources designated to the project

time, staff, funds, equipment.

7.1.4 Extent of previous documentation

7.1.5 Standardization of Terminology

Words used to designate condition may have different meanings to different people within textile conservation, as well as conservators in other specialties.

A. The use of subjective terms such as excellent, good, fair, and poor are helpful in comparing condition among a group of objects, but they are open to interpretation. Providing a list with guidelines for what constitutes "good", "fair" or "poor" condition would be useful to the reader for truly understanding the condition of the object.
B. Due to discrepancy in the meanings of certain terms, the conservator should be specific and explanatory when using such terms as lining, backing, consolidating, etc.
C. A glossary of accepted terminology of textile-related terms is helpful (such as Burnham, Emery, CIETA).

7.1.6 Permanence of records

Documentation files should be well stored and maintained.

A. Use archival quality paper.
B. Photograph with highly stable black and white or color film.
C. Store in archival sleeves in appropriate environmental conditions for the film type.
D. Save on electronic media that will readable in the future.

7.1.7 Danger of further damage

Thorough examination and photodocumentation require that the object be handled. Be aware of (and record) further damage sustained during the documentation process.



Back to Textiles Chapter List