Shrinkage

From Wiki


The act or fact of shrinking; reduction in the size or volume of a substance or material due to contraction such as is caused by heat, cold, or wet [1]

Shrinkage caused by water damage

Related Terms

Synonyms in English

diminishment, diminution, reduction, loss

Translation

English shrinkage
French rétrécissement
Spanish encogimiento
Portuguese encolhimento
Italian restringimento
German schwund
Russian усадка
Arabic انكماش

Discussion

Shrinking can happen in organic materials including cotton, linen, and even wood. Like all organic materials, the cellulosic fibers in linen and cotton fabrics swell as they absorb moisture. This swelling then leads to an increase in the diameter of the yarns that make up the fabric, and as the yarns expand at high moisture levels, the canvas itself shrinks. [2]

Shrinking in wood occurs in response to variations in moisture content, determined by the relative humidity of its environment. [3] So as the relative humidity of the environment rises, wood absorbs moisture and expands, and when the relative humidity falls, wood gives up moisture and contracts. [4]

According to the Conservation Center [5], there is a technique to repair shrinkage called the "Dutch Method" that is used to stretch the canvas. The conservator removes the painting from the stretcher, removes the old lining canvas, and flattens the margins. Then strips of craft paper are adhered to the margins, wetted, and stretched onto a larger strainer. As the craft paper dries, the shrinking process carefully pulls the canvas, allowing the tented paint layer to settle back onto the surface.


References

  1. Shrinkage. (2015). In Oxford English Dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/178902?redirectedFrom=shrinkage&
  2. Pocobene, G. & Hodkinson, I. (1992). Use of a pressure-sensitive adhesive to facilitate the transfer of a severely tented painting. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation, 31(2). Retrieved from http://cool.conservation-us.org/jaic/articles/jaic31-02-002.html
  3. Williams, M. A. (1996). Preservation and care of furniture and wooden objects. American Conservation Consortium. Retrieved from http://www.conservator.com/preservation_and_care.htm
  4. Williams, M. A. (1996). Preservation and care of furniture and wooden objects. American Conservation Consortium. Retrieved from http://www.conservator.com/preservation_and_care.htm
  5. The dutch method as an excellent approach in the treatment of severe shrinkage in canvases. (2007). Retrieved from http://www.theconservationcenter.com/article/677337-the-dutch-method-as-an-excellent


Return to List of Lexicon Terms