Mounting

From Wiki

Attaching to a secondary support; as in attaching a paper artifact to a stiff board, sometimes preparatory to matting, or in science to the mounting of specimens onto slides. (Getty Research Institute, 2004)

Materials needed for mounting a photograph, drawing, print, or other work of art on paper
Mounting a photograph, drawing, or other work on paper with a mat
Mounting objects for display

Related Terms

block mountings, dry mounting, face mounting, float mounting, wet mounting, matting

Synonyms in English

supporting, strengthening

Translation

English mounting
Dutch opplakken
Spanish montaje
Portuguese
Italian
German
Arabic

Discussion

Supports and mounts provide form and stability and alleviate stress, thereby preventing distortions, creasing, and eventual structural damage. Supports also facilitate the transportation of objects. Their design is determined by the object and how it will be stored or exhibited. A successful support is not overly complex, is easily removable, provides as much visual access as possible, and does not apply stress on the object by either insertion or removal. (Jacobson, 2010) It is particularly ideal that the mount be easily removable and use archival quality materials, such as acid-free tissue and boards. Some mounting methods can cause harm to artworks and reduce their value. (Grignonsart)

There are many different methods of mounting:

  • dry mounting - Attaching a drawing, print, photograph, or other work of art done on paper to a cardboard or other backing by using a thermoplastic tissue as an adhesive.
  • face mounting - A process in which a print, usually a photograph, is permanently adhered to a clear sheet of acrylic. This enhances the perception of color and sharpness, due to the acrylic's refractive qualities.
  • float mounting - Type of mounting in which an artwork shows the edges of the paper within the window mat, and appears to float above the backing board.
  • wet mounting - Attaching a drawing, print, photograph, or other work of art done on paper to a cardboard or other backing by using a water-based adhesive.

References

Jacobson, Claudia. 2010. "Preparation." In Rebecca A. Buck and Jean Allman Gilmore (EDs), Museum Registration Methods Fifth Edition. Washington DC: American Alliance of Museums.

Materials and Methods of Mounting. http://www.grignonsart.com/instructions/artmountingmethods.html. (accessed 16 March, 2015)

Mounting. 2004. Art and Architecture Thesaurus Online. Getty Research Institute. http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/aat/ (accessed 16 March, 2015)Return to List of Lexicon Terms