Delaminating

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Delaminating, or delamination, is the separation of layers in an object or material composed of multiple layers (sometimes called a laminate), often due to the failure of an adhesive or binding agent.

Delaminating surface of a tortoiseshell rattle
Delaminating surface on a painting, courtesy Fine Arts Conservancy
Delamination of two layers of paper, courtesy Fine Arts Conservancy

Related Terms

cleavage

Synonyms in English

delamination, splitting

Translation

English delaminating
French délamination
Spanish deslaminación
Portuguese
Italian delaminazione
German
Arabic

Discussion

Agents of deterioration that can cause delamination include incorrect or fluctuating temperatures — which can cause embrittlement or fracturing of a layer of material — and relative humidity — which can cause swelling or shrinkage of a layer of material.[1]

An object may be composed of layers of different materials with "dissimilar rates of expansion and contraction," which is an inherent vice — a weakness in the construction that causes deterioration — that may lead to delamination.[2] For example, the tortoiseshell lining of a wooden box may warp over time and become separated from the wood, which is slower to warp.

Separation occurring "between the paint layers and the support" of a painting is a type of delamination called cleavage.[3]

Delamination can occur in stone objects, especially objects made from layered sedimentary rock such as sandstone and slate, where layers may become detached due exposure to water or changing environmental conditions.[4]

Electronic recording media such as CDs and DVDs are multi-layered laminates that are susceptible to delamination, especially when the adhesive between layers is of poor quality or is improperly or insufficiently cured.

Some delamination is intentional. For example, in library and archival sciences, it is sometimes desirable to "remove laminating material from a document."[5]

References

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  1. Rose, C. L. & Hawks, C. A. (1995). Appendix I: Agents of deterioration; Appendix II: Selections from wall chart: Framework for preservation of museum collections In C. L. Rose, C. A. Hawks, & H. H. Genoways (Eds.), Storage of natural history collections: A preventive conservation approach (p. 14). Cambridge, MA: Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections.
  2. Demeroukas, M. (2010). Condition reporting. In R. A. Buck & J. A. Gilmore (Eds.), MRM5: Museum registration methods (5th ed., p. 224). Washington, DC: The AAM Press, American Association of Museums.
  3. Demeroukas, M. (2010). Condition reporting. In R. A. Buck & J. A. Gilmore (Eds.), MRM5: Museum registration methods (5th ed., p. 228). Washington, DC: The AAM Press, American Association of Museums.
  4. Monument Conservation Collaborative. Delaminations. http://mcc-monument-conservation.com/conservation-treatments/delaminations/ (accessed 10/24/15).
  5. Conservation OnLine. Delamination. http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/dt/dt0992.html (accessed 10/24/15)